Supporter Statements

Accredited employers:

Aviva
“Aviva supports the principles underlying the Living Wage campaign and would encourage other employers in Norwich to consider the benefits of adoption”


City College Norwich logo
“City College Norwich is proud to be a supporter of the Living Wage Campaign. This is important to the college as an employer ourselves and it is also something we want to see our employer partners supporting as well. After completing their further education and training our students need and deserve to move on to jobs that pay a living wage.”


futureprojects
“Implementing the Living Wage was the right thing to do for us as a business and for our employees. Having gone through the process I was determined to support other businesses to do the same and make Norwich a better place for people to live and work”.


NCC-logo
“The City Council is committed to promoting good pay; job security and an opportunity to enjoy the full benefits of citizenship across the city. The Living Wage is an important stepping stone to achieving those objectives”.


PwC
“Given our commitment to ‘Doing the right thing’ we’ve been a big supporter of the Living Wage since early on. It would be inappropriate for PwC as an organisation to turn a blind eye to issues of low pay and long hours for those people involved in delivering important support services to our organisation. This is why PwC have agreed with our suppliers across the UK to implement the Living Wage for our cleaning and catering services.” – Steve Sherwood, Director of Infrastructure Operations.


Personal statements:

William Armstrong, Sheriff of Norwich:

As Sheriff of the City, I am committed to endorsing the aims of Living Wage Norwich. Norwich has been described as the city with everything. It must also strive to be the city for everyone. Supporting Living Wage Norwich is an important and practical way of working for a more just, a more fair, a more inclusive and a more compassionate society. Around 24,500 Norwich citizens take home pay every month which isn’t enough for them or their families to live on. That’s why I am supporting the campaign for Norwich to become a Living Wage city – inspiring employers to pay their workers a decent wage and giving people the dignity at work they deserve.

Jessica Asato, former Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Norwich North:

Around 24,500 Norwich citizens take home pay every month which isn’t enough for them or their families to live on. That’s why I am supporting the campaign for Norwich to become a Living Wage city – inspiring employers to pay their workers a decent wage and giving people the dignity at work they deserve.

Dennis Bacon, Managing Director of Norfolk Independent Care:

‘I have no hesitation in supporting Living Wage Norwich simply because it is the right thing to do, morally and ethically. The economic arguments are equally persuasive because spending money in the local economy increases, creating benefit to businesses and reducing the pressure on welfare payments. County and local councils must recognise the importance of this campaign and ensure that their commissioning and purchasing practices make living wage across Norwich, and indeed Norfolk, a reality…’.

Lesley Grahame, City Councillor for Thorpe Hamlet

A living wage is both ethical and practical. Paying a living wage is like paying your taxes, any  self-respecting business needs to meet its responsibilities in both to get any real benefit from the society that provides its workforce, customers and social environment.
Bargain prices at the expense of someone else’s hardship are not bargains at all, they drive down pay for all of us and reduce our spending power in the long run.   Low pay reduces  jobs by forcing customers for basic goods out of the market and the local economy,  fair pay is vital to  produce a fair and healthy economy in which all  people can thrive.

Adrian Holmes, former City Councillor

“I am committed to working to make the living wage the normality in Norwich and the rest of the UK. The benefits are both in terms of personal well being and in the boost to the local economy. People feel more value when paid a decent wage for their work as well as being able to spend more in the local economy – supporting more local jobs. The government bill for benefits for those in work is reduced allowing spending in other areas of social need.”

Alan Howarth, Rt Hon Lord Howarth of Newport

“The vast gulf between the earnings of the wealthiest and the poorest that has opened up in our country is an affront to dignity and decency. Poverty pay and sweated labour – the injustices generated by untrammelled markets – should not be tolerated. Politicians should work to bring about a society with strong bonds of mutual respect and responsibility.”

Norman Lamb, MP for North Norfolk:

“I strongly support the work of Living Wage Norwich. I have committed to paying staff, including interns, the living wage in Norfolk and Westminster. As Minister for Care and Support, I am aware that you will not achieve great care on the backs of very low paid staff. We have to stamp out any cases of employers flouting the National Minimum Wage law – and name and shame those who do. We should also encourage employers to go beyond that because the benefits are clear both for employers and employees.”

Clive Lewis, MP for Norwich South:

To be honest it never ceases to amaze me that we actually need to have this campaign. Why should anyone work for less than they can actually exist on? The living wage is a no brainer. It’s about very basic social and economic justice.

Dr John Sentamu, The Archbishop of York:

I support Living Wage Norwich, because if we want to see our communities prosper and flourish we must look to reduce the societal divide that currently exists. It cannot be right that 5.2 million people are paid below a Living Wage and that for the first time, the majority of people in poverty in the UK are in working households. The Living Wage Commission is calling on leaders of the main political parties to adopt as a policy the goal of increasing voluntary take-up of the living wage. The report sets out how it is possible to bring at least 1 million people out of low pay and up to a Living Wage right now with no adverse effects on the economy. I hear the Norwich Diocesan Board of Finance has recently become a living wage employer – I applaud the Diocesan Board for this decision. It means Norwich is a living wage diocese in relation to all the bodies the DBF has direct control over. Let us all do what we can.
The emerging recovery means that thousands more businesses are now able to pay a Living Wage to all of their staff – they ought to do this. Let us end income inequality now.

Chloe Smith, MP for Norwich North:

Good employers will know and respect what their employees need, because employees and unions should be able to discuss that with their employers or take their talent elsewhere. Paying the Living Wage is a judgement that responsible employers already make, and although many small firms already do it, it must remain voluntary so that jobs are not squeezed out. I’m a supporter of the first principles of a Living Wage but I challenge the campaign to use good local data. Paying people what they actually need to live on is the right thing to do and the Living Wage Campaign is right to ask something similar to what we have asked through our successful youth employment campaign Norwich For Jobs: do you want to attract the best? Won’t your business benefit from securing good talent? Can you pay your employees what their work is worth? And isn’t Norwich a city with a sense of pride that can achieve responsible success?

Alan Waters, Leader of Norwich City Council:

People with inadequate incomes do not enjoy full citizenship. The pressure to make ends meet; long hours of work for little reward or part time work for low pay means that people in this situation are doing little more than surviving. This is unacceptable in a wealthy country like Britain. It is unacceptable that these are the circumstances for many people in Norwich. The City Council is committed to promoting good pay; job security and an opportunity to enjoy the full benefits of citizenship across the city.
The Living Wage is an important stepping stone to achieving those objectives.

Brian Watkins, Norfolk County Council, Councillor:

I am pleased to support the work of Living Wage Norwich in helping to ensure that employees on low wages are provided with a much better standard of living. Not only would this give them a greater sense of value and self-worth at work, but it would also mean that they can have a more enjoyable and fulfilling family life. Commitment to the living wage ideal will also benefit local employers in bringing about enhanced motivation and productivity within their workforce, which in turn will boost economic activity in the Greater Norwich area.

Simon Wright, former MP for Norwich South:

I support the living wage. Not only is it good for individuals, but it makes good business sense too. Paying a decent wage helps employers to find and keep the best staff in their organisation, and the extra money that goes into pay packets ends up being recycled in support of the local economy. A living wage would help to build a stronger economy in Norwich and a fairer society for all. I am delighted that the Norwich Living Wage Commission is helping to make it a reality.